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Trump has 'made up his mind to withdraw US from Paris climate deal' despite saying publicly he
will
decide next week

President Donald Trump has reportedly told multiple people in private that he will withdraw the US from
the Paris climate agreement.

Though Trump has publicly said he has not yet made up his mind, Axios reports he has privately told
several people of his decision, including EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt.

The outlet spoke with three sources who confirmed the information, though Trump has been known to
change his mind at the last minute.

Trump tweeted Saturday morning to say he would announce his 'final decision' on whether or not the US
will stay in the Paris agreement next week despite coming under intense pressure from world leaders at
the G7 in Sicily.

'I will make my final decision on the Paris Accord next week!' he wrote.

The president earlier declined to comment about the accord, as he refused to give into intense
international pressure.

Within the Environmental Protection Agency, staffers are quieting down on public lobbying and Pruitt
will have fewer television appearances about the issue so that the withdrawal will be 'the President's
victory', according to Axios.

EThere are also concerns within the EPA that Trump could be influenced by the pressures he received
overseas, according to the outlet.
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Trump's son-in-law under FBI scrutiny over alleged Russia ties

US President Donald Trump's son-in-law and his senior adviser Jared Kushner is under scrutiny as part
of the FBI's investigation of alleged Russian meddling in the US presidential election.

Kushner is being probed for his interactions with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak and a banker from
Moscow, US media reported Friday.

Federal investigators believe Kushner has significant information relevant to their inquiry into alleged links
between Trump's campaign team and the Kremlin during the 2016 presidential elections.

Trump has repeatedly denied any collusion between his campaign and Russia and has described the
investigation as the “greatest witch hunt” in the US history.

Despite Russia’s alleged cyber attacks of Democratic officials during last year’s presidential race to help
Trump defeat Hillary Clinton, American intelligence officials have acknowledged there is no evidence that
hackers altered the election result.

The White House is currently engulfed in crisis over allegations that Trump asked the sacked FBI chief
James Comey to drop the inquiry into links between his ex-national security adviser Michael Flynn and
Moscow.

Trump has admitted that Comey’s firing had to do with “the Russian thing,” raising the possibility that
his son-in-law might have pushed him to dismiss the FBI chief.

"I just fired the head of the FBI. He was crazy, a real nut job," the Times quoted Trump.
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Trump: Israelis and Arabs share 'common cause' against Iran

President Donald Trump opened his first visit to Israel Monday, saying he sees growing recognition
among Muslim nations that they share a “common cause” with Israel in their determination to counter
the threats posed by Iran.

Arriving directly from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Trump expressed his hope for cooperation among U.S.
allies in the Middle East. His second stop on the nine-day tour aimed to test the waters for reviving the
dormant Israeli-Palestinian peace process.

Trump, who had previously suggested that it would be easier than anticipated to solve the conflict that
has vexed his predecessors for decades, said that conditions were right in both Israel and the Arab world
to strike what he has called “the ultimate deal.”

“We have before us a rare opportunity to bring security and stability and peace to this region and to its
people,” Trump said upon arrival in Tel Aviv.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called Trump “a true friend” to Israel and expressed optimism
about the president’s role in the Middle East peace process. But obstacles have emerged that may
complicate the relationship between the White House and the Knesset.

Trump’s first stop was a meeting in Jerusalem with Israeli President Reuven Rivlin. In a statement
following the meeting, Trump addressed his meetings the previous day with Arab and Muslim leaders in
Saudi Arabia, and said that there is growing realization that they share a “common cause with you” in
their determination to defeat extremism and deter “the threat posed by Iran.”

But Trump may face concerns from Israelis over the new $110 billion arms deal he announced during
his previous stop in Saudi Arabia as well as questions from Israeli officials about revelations that he
disclosed sensitive Israeli intelligence to Russian officials. U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, speaking
to reporters onboard Air Force One, said the U.S. could provide clarifications to Israel about the
disclosure but said, “I don’t know that there’s anything to apologize for.”
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Iran Presidential Election: Record Turnout in Crucial Vote

illions of voters converged on the  polling stations Friday to decide the outcome of a fiercely contested
race between two competing visions. The choice was whether to hand pragmatic Hassan Rouhani a
stronger mandate to push through much-needed reforms, or give a chance to principlist Ebrahim Raeisi
who believes the incumbent and his aides have mismanaged  the economy. Rouhani, 68, is a staunch
supporter of broader international engagement and liberal economic reforms.

His four years in office is defined by the landmark July 2015 nuclear deal with the six world powers.
The agreement, among other things, is aimed at attracting foreign investment and high-tech to rebuild the
stagnant economy.

Rouhani has made a campaign promise to work toward the removal of "all the remaining (US) sanctions"
hampering economic ties with Europe and Asia.

The president faced stiff competition from Raeisi, 57, a long-serving member of the judiciary and current
custodian of Astan Qods Razavi, the huge conglomerate in charge of the holy shrine of Imam Reza
(PBUH), the eight Shia imam.

Although announcing that he will uphold the nuclear pact should he win, Raeisi has pointed to the
economic difficulties  as proof that Rouhani's diplomatic efforts have failed and has advocated an
"inward-looking" policy for reviving the sluggish economy.   

The cleric has also pledged to boost welfare benefits for the poor, create millions of jobs and fight
corruption.

Long Queues

Weeks-long campaigns whipped up heated emotions and pushed public debates among the 56-million-
strong electorate in the country of 80 million.

Shortly after voting in high-stakes event began at 8 a.m. local time, unusually long queues formed outside
polling stations in mosques and schools around the capital and other major cities, IRNA reported.  

Across the country, over 71,000 election monitors were deployed at nearly 130,000 ballot boxes and
more than 300,000 police officers were stationed to ensure security of  63,000 polling places.
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