Health

Study links less sleep with heart attack and stroke

Individuals should aim to get between seven and eight hours of sleep each night to reduce their risk of developing PAD.

A recent study has found that individuals who sleep less than five hours per night may have a 74% higher chance of developing peripheral artery disease (PAD) compared to those who sleep for seven to eight hours. This condition affects over 200 million people worldwide and causes blockages in the arteries of the legs, which can lead to an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. The study author, Shuai Yuan from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, recommends that individuals should aim to get between seven and eight hours of sleep each night to reduce their risk of developing PAD. Adopting a more physically active lifestyle and managing pain effectively may also be helpful for preventing PAD

A research article published in the European Heart Journal-Open examined the connection between sleep duration, daytime napping, and the risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD) by studying over 650,000 participants. The study found that adults who slept less than five hours per night had a significantly higher risk of developing PAD compared to those who slept for seven to eight hours, as observed in a group of 53,416 individuals. This finding was further supported by analyses conducted on 156,582 and 452,028 participants. The study also found that there is a causal relationship between short sleep and an increased risk of PAD, and that individuals with PAD are more likely to experience insufficient sleep. These results suggest that inadequate sleep may increase the likelihood of developing PAD, and having PAD may increase the risk of poor sleep.

In a study involving over 650,000 participants, it was found that sleeping for eight or more hours per night was linked to a 24% higher risk of developing peripheral artery disease (PAD) compared to sleeping for seven to eight hours, according to an observational analysis of 53,416 adults. This result was also supported by analyses of larger populations of 156,582 and 452,028 individuals. However, no causal relationships were found between long sleep duration and PAD. Similarly, the study found that individuals who took daytime naps had a 32% higher risk of PAD compared to those who did not nap, but no causal links were identified. Study author Shuai Yuan emphasized the need for further research to determine the relationship between long sleep duration, daytime napping, and PAD, stating that although observational associations were found, causality could not be confirmed.

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