‘We can give world a glimpse of Golden India with ancient technologies’

Bollywood icon Amitabh Bachchan had hosted her in the popular show 'Kaun Banega Crorepati', following which her story has become widely popular.

Jaipur: Ruma Devi, a fashion designer from Rajasthans Barmer district who has made around 22,000 women self-dependent by giving them decent jobs despite studying till just the eighth standard, feels that the Indians have abundant knowledge which needs to be put in practice to get a glimpse of Golden India.

“Our Indian roots had abundant knowledge and technologies which are forgotten in the present era. There is a need to put the ancient technologies into practice in order to give the world a glimpse of Golden India,” she said.

Ruma’s client list includes eminent designers from across the world who have been visiting Barmer to work with her.

Her exquisite hand embroidery has attracted many clients, including fashion designers Anita Dongre, Bibi Russell, Abrahim Thakore, Rohit Kamra, Manish Saksena and many others, both from India and overseas.

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Bollywood icon Amitabh Bachchan had hosted her in the popular show ‘Kaun Banega Crorepati’, following which her story has become widely popular.

Ruma had won the ‘Designer of the year’ title at the Textiles Fair India 2019 besides receiving the Nari Shakti National Award in 2018 from President Ram Nath Kovind for transforming the lives of thousands of women in and around Barmer district.

“There are plenty of things that, if revived by the youth, can impact the whole world. The Golden India which we represented in the past is still there. The need of the hour is to put the ancient technologies in practice to give the world a glimpse of Golden India,” she said.

This fashionista who emerged from the rustic rural lanes of Rajasthan has scripted a success story of her own by carving a path, which has all the ingredients of a Bollywood script.

She was born in a financially weak family and had lost her mother when she was just five. Her father then re-married after which her real struggle begun.

Her family members got her name dropped from school when she reached class VIII and engaged her in household chores.

Each day, she travelled for around 10 km to fetch water. At 17, she was married but poverty continued to chase her.

Fed up, she formed a group of around 10 women and collected Rs 100 from each of them to purchase raw materials to make bags with hand embroidery on them.

The bags were sold in the villages and soon their demand grew.

The Grameen Vikaas and Chetna Sansthan in Barmer came to know of her work and in 2018, she became a member of the organisation.

In 2010, she became the president of the organisation and since then, there has been no looking back for Ruma.

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